Photo
1 hour ago
theparisreview:

Seventy years of Partisan Review, now online. (via)

theparisreview:

Seventy years of Partisan Review, now online. (via)

(via hardcorefornerds)

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Photo
4 hours ago

(Source: shinyhill)

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Video
17 hours ago


visual-poetry:

»american psycho« by mimi cabell and jason huff

this book was made by sending the entire text of bret easton ellis’ american psycho between two gmail accounts page by page. we saved the relational ads for each page and added them back into the text as footnotes. in total, we collected over 800 relevant ads for the book. the constellations of footnoted ads throughout these pages retell the story of american psycho in absence of the original text. this retelling reveals gmail’s unpredictable insensitivity to violence, racism, and sex. it serves as a blurry portrait of an algorithm that exists in our everyday communication simultaneously forming a new portrait of the lead character, patrick bateman.

jason huff/mimi cabell nyc 2012

here you can download the pdf for free

[via]

(via no-ideas-but-in-things)

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Photo
21 hours ago
cerasiferae:

mosaic of the Sibylla Lybica (Libyan Sybil), floor of the Duomo di Siena.
"The Libyan Sibyl, named Phemonoe, was the prophetic priestess presiding over the Zeus Ammon Oracle (Zeus represented with the horns of Ammon) at Siwa Oasis in the Libyan Desert.
The word Sibyl comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. There were many Sibyls in the ancient world, but the Libyan Sibyl, in Classical mythology, Lamia, foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed.”
In Pausanias Description of Greece, the sibyl names her parents in her oracles:
I am by birth half mortal, half divine;An immortal nymph was my mother, my father an eater of grain;On my mother’s side of Idaean birth, but my fatherland was redMarpessus, sacred to the Mother, and the river Aidoneus. (Pausanias 10.12.3)”
The Greeks say she was the daughter of Zeus and Lamia, a Libyan queen loved by Zeus. Euripides mentions the Libyan Sibyl in the prologue of the Lamia. The Greeks further state that she was the first woman to chant oracles, she lived most of her life in Samos, and that the name Sibyl was given her by the Libyans.
Serapion, in his epic verses, says that the Sibyl, even when dead ceased not from divination. And he writes that, what proceeded from her into the air after her death, was what gave oracular utterances in voices and omens; and on her body being changed into earth, and the grass as natural growing out of it, whatever beasts happening to be in that place fed on it exhibited to men an accurate knowledge of futurity by their entrails. He thinks also, that the face seen in the moon is her soul”
(wikipedia) 

cerasiferae:

mosaic of the Sibylla Lybica (Libyan Sybil), floor of the Duomo di Siena.

"The Libyan Sibyl, named Phemonoe, was the prophetic priestess presiding over the Zeus Ammon Oracle (Zeus represented with the horns of Ammon) at Siwa Oasis in the Libyan Desert.

The word Sibyl comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. There were many Sibyls in the ancient world, but the Libyan Sibyl, in Classical mythology, Lamia, foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed.”

In Pausanias Description of Greece, the sibyl names her parents in her oracles:

I am by birth half mortal, half divine;
An immortal nymph was my mother, my father an eater of grain;
On my mother’s side of Idaean birth, but my fatherland was red
Marpessus, sacred to the Mother, and the river Aidoneus.
(Pausanias 10.12.3)”

The Greeks say she was the daughter of Zeus and Lamia, a Libyan queen loved by Zeus. Euripides mentions the Libyan Sibyl in the prologue of the Lamia. The Greeks further state that she was the first woman to chant oracles, she lived most of her life in Samos, and that the name Sibyl was given her by the Libyans.

Serapion, in his epic verses, says that the Sibyl, even when dead ceased not from divination. And he writes that, what proceeded from her into the air after her death, was what gave oracular utterances in voices and omens; and on her body being changed into earth, and the grass as natural growing out of it, whatever beasts happening to be in that place fed on it exhibited to men an accurate knowledge of futurity by their entrails. He thinks also, that the face seen in the moon is her soul”

(wikipedia

(via ancient-serpent)

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Photo
1 day ago
discardingimages:

hipster Moses
Bible, Hagenau ca. 1441-1449.
Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, Cod. Pal. germ. 19, fol. 141v

discardingimages:

hipster Moses

Bible, Hagenau ca. 1441-1449.

Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, Cod. Pal. germ. 19, fol. 141v

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Photo
1 day ago
design-is-fine:

Michael Schwab, Illustration for Levi’s, 1980-85. Levi Strauss. USA. Via emuseum

design-is-fine:

Michael Schwab, Illustration for Levi’s, 1980-85. Levi Strauss. USA. Via emuseum

(Source: emuseum.ch)

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Video
1 day ago


silentambassadors:

Publius Vergilius Maro, the great Roman epic poet, died on this date in 19 B.C.E.  If you’ve never been forced or inclined to dip into the Aeneid, give her a go—it’s got all that epic stuff that makes ancient literature such a blast.  Aeneas [ancestor of Romulus and Remus, son of Anchises and Venus (the Venus), third cousin of Hector (<3)] survives the Trojan War and bumbles around the Mediterranean, à la Odysseus, inducing queens to run themselves through, &c., before founding what would become Rome.  [Once upon a time, this stamp enthusiast was assigned the Swan of Mantua’s Aeneid and through a rather egregious inattention to detail read a good deal of the Eclogues before realizing the mistake.  So if epic (and, as per usual, rather inept—but I suppose if these ancient vagabonds had thought to stop and ask for directions, world literature would have suffered, what?) wandering doesn’t appeal, a little rustic reckoning could be just what you need—gratifyingly engaging, truth be told.]  Thanking you, Vergilī, for reminding us that LATIN DIDN’T FALL WITH ROME.

Stamp details:
Top, second row, third row, fourth row left:
Issued on: October 21, 1930
From: Rome, Italy
MC #345-354

Fourth row right:
Issued in: 1982
From: Monaco, Monaco
MC #1566

Fifth row left:
Issued on: June 9, 1979
From: Rome, Italy
MC #1661

Fifth row middle:
Issued on: September 19, 1981
From: Rome, Italy
MC #1775

Fifth row right:
Issued on: March 26, 2002
From: Tunis, Tunisia
MC #1518

Sixth row:
Issued in: 1981
From: Vatican City, Vatican
MC #783-784

Stamp on bottom:
Issued on: June 4, 1982
From: Paris, France
MC #2293

(Source: colnect.com)

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Photo
1 day ago
swamidigital:

Radha Krishna: Divine love.
Kota, Rajasthan, India ca. 1720.
Currently in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.
Photograph by Dilip Goswami.

swamidigital:

Radha Krishna: Divine love.

Kota, Rajasthan, India ca. 1720.

Currently in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

Photograph by Dilip Goswami.

(via mertseger)

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Photo
1 day ago
design-is-fine:

David Lance Goines, poster artwork Velo Sport Bicycles, 1970. Berkeley, USA. Via FAMSF

design-is-fine:

David Lance Goines, poster artwork Velo Sport Bicycles, 1970. Berkeley, USA. Via FAMSF

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Video
2 days ago


muspeccoll:

dukelibraries:

This 14th century Italian manuscript of Boethius’s De Consolatione Philosophiae features a historiated initial, decorative border, and a (very amusing) grotesque on its first page. Also pictured is the verso of the front flyleaf which has scribbled notes and names in Latin and Italian, as well as some doodles. 

Medieval doodles!

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