Photo
13 hours ago
dominatrixeditrix:

More like “You can’t expect me to only spend an hour?!”

dominatrixeditrix:

More like “You can’t expect me to only spend an hour?!”

(Source: amandaonwriting)

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Video
19 hours ago


dominatrixeditrix:

Coffee and writing snark?

I. NEED. THESE.

edit: source here 

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Photo
1 day ago
whatsdifferentincanada:

Canadian graffiti. 
(h/t Elliot)

whatsdifferentincanada:

Canadian graffiti. 

(h/t Elliot)

(via kettunainen)

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Video
1 day ago


typeworship:

Here Be Monsters

I noticed this wonderful Icelandic project of illustrated type inspired by medieval maps featuring fantastical sea creatures. 

Design by Reykjavík based Stella Björg, these decorated capitals remind me of the Victorian illustrations I’ve written about recently. I love that several of the creatures appear to be based on specific Icelandic mythical beasts, as named at the bottom of the print. I also really like the print colours and flecked paper that gives the final work its antique look.

My “Here Be Monsters” illustrated letters started from the simple idea of writing “MONSTER” but having finished it just didn’t seem like there was much left to complete the alphabet. I was in no hurry to complete it, so very slowly monstrous letters got added and finally there appeared a complete alphabet. - Stella Björg

(Source: behance.net, via moschops911)

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Photo
2 days ago
superseventies:

Fleetwood Mac: Stevie Nicks and Bob Welch on stage.

superseventies:

Fleetwood Mac: Stevie Nicks and Bob Welch on stage.

(Source: pinterest.com)

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Video
2 days ago


bookstorey:

John Lehmann’s New Writing


In 1936 at the age of 29 the poet John Lehmann (1907 - 1987) launched a new monthly literary journal, New Writing, which became the mouthpiece for a generation of writers that included Cecil Day Lewis, W.H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood. These writers, who were too young to have fought in the First World War but old enough to have been left deeply traumatized by it, felt themselves to be overlooked, misunderstood and ignored by the older generation and subsequently felt a keen sense of isolation.


Whereas Lehmann characterized the older generation as ‘sympathetic observers’ (his description of Virginia Woolf with whom he had a fraught artistic and business relationship at Hogarth Press), he believed the artist’s role was not merely to reflect, but also to actively participate in shaping political and social events. With New Writing he wanted to bridge the gap between the author and reader: to create 'an effective brotherhood border between victims of oppression' and the 'sense of broader comradeships.'


The inclusion within New Writing’s pages of biographies and photographic snapshots of the writers, and himself as editor, were an attempt by Lehmann to develop personas that he hoped would breed a sense of their familiarity among its readers. Photographic images, of not just the writers, also played an important part in his design. He used them to share art from home and abroad alongside scenes from everyday life in order to blur the lines of distinction between the two.


Although Lehmann recognized that he ultimately failed in his ambition to bring the writer and the reader closer together (and just as the magazine had turned its back on the previous generation, in 1950 it found itself snubbed by the one that followed), New Writing has been deservedly described as a 'collective masterpiece of a generation.'


The books in the photographs are Penguin paperback issues of volumes No. 5 (April 1941) and No. 32 (1947) that contain prose and poetry from C. Day Lewis, W.H Auden, Edith Sitwell and Lawrence Durrell. The magazine was initially published by Bodley Head and continued to appear sporadically in hardback format till 1946. Its move to Penguin in 1940, where it ran for 40 editions until 1950, no doubt, broadened its popularity and helped it to secure a reliable source of paper in a period of scarcity during the Second World War. Its first Penguin edition also contained the first publication of George Orwell’s essay Shooting the Elephant (1940).


For further book scraps, please follow on Twitter.

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Post
2 days ago

ʷʰʸ      ʷʰʸ             ʷʰʸ

       ʷʰʸ            ʷʰʸ       ʷʰʸ      ʷʰʸ

   ʷʰʸ         jeans with fake pockets   ʷʰʸ

         ʷʰʸ            ʷʰʸ

Any pants, really.

(Source: clrama, via starfckers)

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Photo
3 days ago

(Source: moschops911)

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Photo
3 days ago
oldroze:

The Intoxication of Wine ca. 1780–90

Clodion (Claude Michel) (French, Nancy 1738–1814 Paris)

Clodion, whose career spanned the last decades of the ancien régime through the French Revolution and Napoleon’s reign, embraced his era’s taste for antiquity. Sometimes this preference is more apparent in his choice of theme than in his style. While often Neoclassical, his manner at times remained quite Rococo, as in the present example. Although Clodion received a number of important commissions for monumental marble sculptures, his fame and popularity rested on his skill at modeling small-scale terracotta groups for private collectors. The seeming spontaneity of this composition, a rapturous embrace, in which it appears that the senses are totally abandoned, was achieved only after much meditation. This work is one of the most minutely studied of all the Bacchic orgies that were Clodion’s specialty. The front and back show deliberate adjustments of angles, openings, and masses, all checked and balanced as the model passed under his fingers on his trestle table. Clodion was deeply steeped in the imagery of Greek and Roman art, but the deliciously charged rhythms seen here are entirely his own. He made such works for connoisseurs during his stay in Rome from 1762 to 1771, but this group is so highly evolved that it may date to the 1780s.

oldroze:

The Intoxication of Winca. 1780–90

Clodion (Claude Michel) (French, Nancy 1738–1814 Paris)

Clodion, whose career spanned the last decades of the ancien régime through the French Revolution and Napoleon’s reign, embraced his era’s taste for antiquity. Sometimes this preference is more apparent in his choice of theme than in his style. While often Neoclassical, his manner at times remained quite Rococo, as in the present example. Although Clodion received a number of important commissions for monumental marble sculptures, his fame and popularity rested on his skill at modeling small-scale terracotta groups for private collectors. 

The seeming spontaneity of this composition, a rapturous embrace, in which it appears that the senses are totally abandoned, was achieved only after much meditation. This work is one of the most minutely studied of all the Bacchic orgies that were Clodion’s specialty. The front and back show deliberate adjustments of angles, openings, and masses, all checked and balanced as the model passed under his fingers on his trestle table. 

Clodion was deeply steeped in the imagery of Greek and Roman art, but the deliciously charged rhythms seen here are entirely his own. He made such works for connoisseurs during his stay in Rome from 1762 to 1771, but this group is so highly evolved that it may date to the 1780s.

(via ancient-serpent)

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Photo
3 days ago
mediumaevum:

Beginning at sundown on April 14, many Jews observed Passover at a Seder, the special meal that commemorates their ancestors’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the haggadah. The Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is kept, is a rare, beautifully illustrated manuscript created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its own story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus.
Watch the PBS documentary on this extraordinary manuscript, a survivor of the 1492 expulsion of the Jews from Spain, two world wars, and the four-year seige of the city of Sarajevo (1992-1996).

mediumaevum:

Beginning at sundown on April 14, many Jews observed Passover at a Seder, the special meal that commemorates their ancestors’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the haggadah. The Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is kept, is a rare, beautifully illustrated manuscript created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its own story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus.

Watch the PBS documentary on this extraordinary manuscript, a survivor of the 1492 expulsion of the Jews from Spain, two world wars, and the four-year seige of the city of Sarajevo (1992-1996).

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