Quote
2 days ago

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Photo
2 days ago
design-is-fine:

Rupprecht Geiger, n.d. Via Galerie Walzinger

design-is-fine:

Rupprecht Geiger, n.d. Via Galerie Walzinger

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Photo
2 days ago
centuriespast:

Orpheus
(painting 1 of 6 in the series ‘The Progress of Human Knowledge and Culture’)
by James Barry

Date painted: 1777–1783
Oil on canvas, 360 x 462 cm
Collection: Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce

centuriespast:

Orpheus

(painting 1 of 6 in the series ‘The Progress of Human Knowledge and Culture’)

by James Barry

Date painted: 1777–1783

Oil on canvas, 360 x 462 cm

Collection: Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce

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Photo
2 days ago
fixedthatforya:

tattoolit:

From T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” 

fixedthatforya:

tattoolit:

From T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” 

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Photo
3 days ago
design-is-fine:

Luba Lukova, There Is No Death for the Songs, 1987. Silkscreen. Via MoMA. Exhibition Designing Modern Women 1890–1990.

design-is-fine:

Luba Lukova, There Is No Death for the Songs, 1987. Silkscreen. Via MoMA. Exhibition Designing Modern Women 1890–1990.

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Video
3 days ago


design-is-fine:

Fritz Brinckmann & Blixa Bargeld, artwork for CD Triset of Tabula Rasa, Interim and Malediction – played by Einstürzende Neubauten, 1994. 

Limited edition + Bonus CD Footnotes. Mute Records, London and Rough Trade Records, Herne, Germany. Painting by Ambrosius Bosschaert the Younger. Source: discogs.

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Photo
3 days ago
axivmatic:

Found these three in an antique shop. They’re leather-bound, circa 1910. I love old things. Almost afraid to read them because they’re really falling apart.

axivmatic:

Found these three in an antique shop. They’re leather-bound, circa 1910. I love old things. Almost afraid to read them because they’re really falling apart.

(via fuckyeaharthuriana)

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Video
3 days ago


erikkwakkel:

Yoga alphabets

The first letter of a medieval text was often made to look like a picture. In these examples the capital letters are filled with action figures doing all sorts of gymnastic exercises. There is something special about them, because they are all taken not from regular medieval books but from so-called Alphabet Books. These objects were used by decorators: they provided patterns for each letter of the alphabet, in a variety of themes. The decorator picked a letter that he (or his client) liked and duplicated it onto the page he was working on. The diversity of styles is clear from the examples above, which are taken from three different late-medieval pattern books: some are funny, others serious. Most of them feature people in uncomfortable positions, as if they are attending yoga class. These one-letter shows acted as eye candy at the outset of the text: they got the reader in just the right mood.

The images above are from three sources: the Macclesfield Alphabet Book (London, British, Library, MS 8887), fully browsable here; Giovannino de’ Grassi’s notebook (Bergamo, Biblioteca Civica, MS Cassaf. 1.21), viewable here; and the alphabet book of Gregorius Bock (Yale, Beinecke Library, MS 439, of 1510-17), online here.

(via sexycodicology)

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Photo
4 days ago
glamidols:

Lou Reed, 1973.Photo by Dustin Pittman

glamidols:

Lou Reed, 1973.
Photo by Dustin Pittman

(via jonservo)

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